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Hours: Tues - Fri 10:00 am to 4:00 pm,
Saturday Noon - 4:00 pm


(tele) 541-278-9201  
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Pendleton Center for the Arts

ALWAYS Free Admission

If you’re looking for the shortest path from the artist’s hand to your home, this is the place.

The Pendleton Foundation Trust Fine Craft Gallery, our fine craft sales gallery, features the work of some of the best artisans in the region. Our relationship with professional and emerging artists allows us to showcase their newest work and, very often, one-of-a-kind offerings. Whether you’re looking for a wedding, birthday, or anniversary gift, or just a little something for yourself, we’ve got something for you. And our members always receive an additional 10% off all purchases.

Our craft gallery is made possible by the Pendleton Foundation Trust, whose very generous donation made renovation of the space possible. Founded in 1928, the Pendleton Foundation Trust is the oldest community foundation in Oregon and has contributed more than $1 million to partially or entirely fund projects in Pendleton. Our community is a much richer place to live thanks to the efforts of the Foundation.

This website is owned and maintained by the Arts Council of Pendleton and the Pendleton Center for the Arts © 2005

The Arts Council of Pendleton is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization established in 1974

This site is generously sponsored by Eastern Oregon Telecom

Gallery Hours:

Tuesday - Friday 10:00 am to 4:00 pm

Saturday   Noon - 4:00 pm

 

All donations to the Pendleton Foundation Trust help the principal grow, making it possible to give back more to the community. Call the Pendleton Foundation Trust at 541-276-3331 to participate through direct donation, estate gift or trust, or memorial gift. Contributions may also be mailed to POB 218, Pendleton, OR 97801.

Focus on one of our

PFT Fine Craft Gallery Artists:

 

“Great Blue Heron”

by Hiroko Cannon

 

When Hiroko Cannon was growing up in the vibrant metropolis of Osaka, Japan, she never dreamed that she’d land in a tiny town in the high desert plateau of Eastern Oregon. Or that her paintings of the bird life that surrounds the Umatilla River would be so sought after.

 

Hiroko always loved to paint and studied illustration and fine art in Osaka. She worked there as a graphic designer, creating illustrations for department stores and after immigrating to the United States in 1987 she continued to do freelance work for Women’s magazines in Japan, producing illustrations and writing articles about life in Pendleton. She put aside painting to concentrate on raising her two children, both of whom were heavily involved in music and required lots of shuttling to and from practice sessions, performances and other activities.

 

When her youngest child hit high school and began driving, Hiroko knew she wanted to begin painting again. It was a donation request that sparked an interest in painting birds. Lynn Tompkins of Blue Mountain Wildlife Rescue asked if Hiroko would make a painting for the organization’s annual auction. Always a bird lover and an active supporter of the region’s non-profit organizations, she readily agreed.

 

 

The public’s reaction to that first painting took her by surprise. The painting, depicting almost a dozen birds in one composition, sold for several hundred dollars and other auction-goers asked where they could purchase more of her work. She began making more paintings and having reproductions made that were sold at the Pendleton Center for the Arts. She walked away with the coveted “People’s Choice Award” at two consecutive Open Regional Exhibits at the Center and the demand for her work was increasing.

 

In spring of 2007 Hiroko was asked by the Center to create a painting for the Café area of the building. When she unveiled the finished work for the staff, they were in awe. The large painting, showing a Great Blue Heron standing on a piece of wood in the river, measured 33 x 24 inches and every feather and scale was rendered in intricate detail.

 

“Ten years ago I remember walking down by the river and seeing just one Great Blue Heron,” said Cannon. “The abundance of herons that we see now is the result of a healthier river – and the result of a lot of hard work” She used several photos of herons to provide the basic physiology of the bird, then relied on her own observations to provide the posture, eyes and sense of movement.

 

A few copies of the limited edition are still available in the Craft Gallery. 70% of each sales goes directly to the artist and 30% goes to support the free programs that we provide to the community.

A GREAT Place to SHOP!